You can start the virtual stroll at the place of your choice by selecting a key location from the list below.
Bernstrasse (1)
Here we are at the fortified entrance of the Bern Gate (Berntor). It dates from the 18th century, the original tower having been destroyed in 1476 during the Battle of Murten, which saw the defeat of the Duke of Burgundy Charles the Conqueror by the Swiss Confederates.
Bernstrasse (2)
Here we are facing the Berntor, the Bern Gate, the western entrance to the city. Look to the left: you will see the bell tower of the German church (Deutsche Kirche) and, below it, the beginning of the path around the walls to the Törli, the southern city gate.
Berntor (1)
The Bern Gate, which controls the eastern entrance to the town, was first mentioned in 1239 but was completely destroyed during the Battle of Murten in 1476. The present gate dates back to the second half of the 18th century and its clockwork dates from 1712. Its three stone weights, cannonballs from the Battle of Murten, are still wound every day.
Berntor (2)
Here we see the Berne Gate from inside the city, turning our back to the main street. On the right you see the Deutsche Kirchgasse (German Church Street) and on the left the Französische Kirchgasse (French Church Street).
Castle Courtyard
The courtyard of the castle is permanently open to the public and every year the Murten Classics festival is held here in August and September. From the esplanade you can enjoy the view over the lake and the Vully.
Castle Murten (1)
Count Peter II of Savoy had the Castle of Murten built in 1255. Its large four-sided tower was the keep from which Adrian I von Bubenberg, in charge of the defence of Murten, watched the famous battle of 1476 when the Confederates defeated William the Conqueror, Duke of Burgundy.
Castle Murten (2)
At the end of the Savoyard domination, the castle became the administrative seat of the Bernese and Fribourg bailiffs, then served in turn as a hospital, barracks or prison. Today it houses one of the prefectures of the canton of Fribourg and cannot be visited, except for its keep which is open to the public from June to October.
Castle Viewpoint
A superb view over Lake Murten, with the vineyards of Mount Vully on the other shore. On the other side of this long hill is Lake Neuchâtel, the largest of the three lakes at the foot of the Jura mountains. On this side, the southern exposure allows the production of great and relatively unknown wines that we recommend you to discover!
Church and ramparts
Despite a 12-day siege by a 15,000 to 30,000-strong Burgundian army during the Battle of Murten in 1476, the city walls, defended by a garrison of about 2,000 men, held firm and are extraordinarily well preserved. Here we see part of the eastern ramparts, the German church and the Cat Tower (Katzenturm).
Französische Kirchgasse (1)
This alley starts from the main street just after the Bern Gate and joins the Rathausgasse (Town Hall Street) in front of the French church, which gave it its name.
Französische Kirchgasse (2)
This alley starts from the main street just after the Bern Gate and joins the Rathausgasse (Town Hall Street) in front of the French church, which gave it its name.
French Church
A hospital for the indigent founded in 1239 housed a chapel of St Catherine in the south of the town, which was demolished in the run-up to the war a few months before the Battle of Murten (1476). It was rebuilt here, intra muros, in a late Gothic style. As it serves as a reformed temple for French-speaking people, it is called the French Church.
Kreuzgasse (1)
Kreuzgasse bisects the medieval town, running perpendicular to the three main streets. It starts at the Törli, the southern gate to the city, crosses the Schulgasse/Deutsche Kirchgasse and then the main street, and ends at Rathausgasse, where a passageway under the town hall and steep stairs lead down to the lakeside.
Kreuzgasse (2)
Kreuzgasse bisects the medieval town, running perpendicular to the three main streets. It starts at the Törli, the southern gate to the city, crosses the Schulgasse/Deutsche Kirchgasse and then the main street, and ends at Rathausgasse, where a passageway under the town hall and steep stairs lead down to the lakeside.
Main Street (1)
The town of Murten was founded in 1170 and its main street is a true baroque masterpiece, with arcades whose construction began in the 15th century. Unfortunately, it is not closed to traffic and is lined with parking spaces on one side, which partly spoils the show. However, it is well preserved and protected. Shop signs, for example, are required to be sober in style and illuminated signs are not allowed.
Main Street (2)
The town of Murten was founded in 1170 and its main street is a true baroque masterpiece, with arcades whose construction began in the 15th century. Unfortunately, it is not closed to traffic and is lined with parking spaces on one side, which partly spoils the show. However, it is well preserved and protected. Shop signs, for example, are required to be sober in style and illuminated signs are not allowed.
Main Street (3)
Murten is bisected by the Kreuzgasse alley, which runs perpendicular to the three main streets that run from east to west. Here we are facing the section of the Kreuzgasse that runs towards the Törli, the southern gate. The northern section is a few metres further on.
Main Street (4)
Murten is bisected by the Kreuzgasse alley, which runs perpendicular to the three main streets that run from east to west. Here we are facing the section of the Kreuzgasse that runs north towards the town hall. The southern section is a few metres further on.
Main Street (5)
The town of Murten was founded in 1170 and its main street is a true baroque masterpiece, with arcades whose construction began in the 15th century. Unfortunately, it is not closed to traffic and is lined with parking spaces on one side, which partly spoils the show. However, it is well preserved and protected. Shop signs, for example, are required to be sober in style and illuminated signs are not allowed.
Main Street (6)
At the very end of the main street, you can either turn left into Schulgasse, which takes you back to the Berntor (east gate), or take Schlossgasse, which leads to the castle.
Path to lake (1)
Parallel to Ryffor Street, which is open to traffic, this pedestrian walkway climbs from the lakeside road (Ryf) to the square opposite the Berntor, the eastern entrance to the old town of Murten.
Path to lake (2)
Parallel to Ryffor Street, which is open to traffic, this pedestrian walkway climbs from the lakeside road (Ryf) to the square opposite the Berntor, the eastern entrance to the old town of Murten.
Ramparts Path (1)
This path runs along the entire southern city wall. We will follow it halfway to enter the old town through the Törli, the southern gate. But first let's go down into the old moat for a closer look to the wall!
Ramparts Path (2)
We now see the city walls, the German church tower and the Cat Tower (Katzenturm) from the south.
Ramparts Path (3)
The path around the town walls passes here the Tournaletta (or Türmchen, small tower) on the left, built in 1238, and the Pfaffenturm (Priest Tower) on the right.
Rathausgasse (1)
The Rathausgasse (Town Hall Alley) is one of the three streets that cross the old town of Murten from east to west. Like the main street, it is lined with numerous restaurants and cafés. Many of the houses are not as old as those on the main street, but you will see some real architectural gems.
Rathausgasse (2)
The Rathausgasse (Town Hall Alley) is one of the three streets that cross the old town of Murten from east to west. Like the main street, it is lined with numerous restaurants and cafés. Many of the houses are not as old as those on the main street, but you will see some real architectural gems.
Rathausgasse (3)
The building with the baroque tower and clock that you see on the left is the town hall (Rathaus). Here you will find a passageway down to the lake and an alleyway that leads to the main street and the Törli (southern gate).
Rathausgasse (4)
The Rathausgasse (Town Hall Alley) is one of the three streets that cross the old town of Murten from east to west. Like the main street, it is lined with numerous restaurants and cafés. Many of the houses are not as old as those on the main street, but you will see some real architectural gems.
Rathausgasse (5)
The Rathausgasse (Town Hall Alley) is one of the three streets that cross the old town of Murten from east to west. Like the main street, it is lined with numerous restaurants and cafés. Many of the houses are not as old as those on the main street, but you will see some real architectural gems.
Rathausgasse (6)
The Rathausgasse (Town Hall Alley) is one of the three streets that cross the old town of Murten from east to west. Like the main street, it is lined with numerous restaurants and cafés. Many of the houses are not as old as those on the main street, but you will see some real architectural gems.
Schlossgasse (1)
Schlossgasse (Castle Alley) connects the main street with the western end of Rathausgasse (Townhall Street) where Murten Castle stands.
Schlossgasse (2)
Here we are at the end of Schlossgasse (Castle Lane), opposite Murten Castle. To the left of the castle, Schlossgasse becomes Bahnhofstrasse and leads to the railway station. To the right, Rathausgasse leads to the town hall.
Schulgasse/Deutsche Kirchgasse
At the point where it is crossed by Kreuzgasse, this street, which runs parallel to the main street, changes its name. To the east it is Deutsche Kirchgasse, which leads to the German church, and to the west it is Schulstrasse, which goes towards the castle.
Town Hall (1)
The Town Hall (Rathaus) was rebuilt after the town fire of 1416 and was altered and extended in the mid-18th century. The baroque tower and clock were added in 1816. Here we turn our backs on the Kreuzgasse, which bisects the city and leads to the Törli, the southern gate.
Town Hall (2)
Here we are facing the vaulted passageway that leads to a beautiful viewpoint, at the top of the stairs that go down to the main road running along the lake.
Town Hall Viewpoint
The vaulted passage under the town hall leads to this spectacular view of Lake Murten and Mount Vully. From here, stairs lead down to the Ryf, the lakeside road. We'll go there to shoot panoramas on our next visit to Murten!
Törli (South Gate)
This is the small southern gate at the foot of the Schimmeltor. If you want to go up to the chemin de ronde, go through the gate and then look to the right, there are stairs leading up to it.
Törliplatz
The "Törliplatz" (small gate square) is the entrance to the town from the south. The large square tower is the Schimmelturm, with the white tower called Kleiner Schimmel to its left and the Schaalturm a little further on. The roof of the Roter Turm can be seen just beyond.
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